Meeting Alice de Miramon

Alice de Miramon

Born in Dakar in 1973, Alice de Miramon is a French artist whose alluring works have been exhibited internationally. Through her enchanting and romantic paintings, de Miramon transports us to fascinating corners of the world; giving us a glimpse into her vast imagination.
Join us on our journey to discover the world of Alice de Miramon
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You’re very well travelled, and your works themselves are also invitations to travel, is this a source of inspiration for you?

I grew up with access to a variety of cultures and opportunities to travel. The possibility of jumping on a plane and discovering another world was always an option for me.

I loved finding myself in the middle of nowhere, straddled between two unknown destinations. Later on, I began an immobile journey through my work, where my paintings would become the destinations I fantasised about. Although the depiction of the exotic is outdated, my paintings allowed me to “travel” everywhere.

I loved finding myself in the middle of nowhere, straddled between two unknown destinations.

What inspires you in the art world? Have you got any favourite artists?

I was captivated by Japanese prints and Henri Rousseau from a very young age. The illuminated manuscripts of the Book of Hours were probably my first sources of inspiration; the rich and vivid colours continue to influence my work today.

Alice de Miramon

Women and couples are central to your work, why are they key themes for you?

There is certainly an element of anthropomorphism to my works, but purely in a figurative sense. My work on the female body is a way of exploring forms and imperfections- acting like a visual quest to self-acceptance.

It is also a way to depict the whimsical, dream-like and welcoming world these women belong to. Meanwhile, the figure of the couple allows me to present eroticsm and love from a female perspective

The possibility of jumping on a plane and discovering another world was always an option for me.


Can you tell us a bit about your technique?

I use very old sheets of paper [from books, newspapers etc] as and when I find them. I then dye them because for me, these small treasures are like living creatures which need to be revived and given a new lease of life. I mostly use acrylic and occasionally ink, and I like to start with the colours which I can feel. Combining the sentimental nature of these colours with the uniqueness of the paper, helps me realise a series of work which reflects my graphical research. This research however, is like a never-ending quest, it always begins both spontaneously and ritualistically. I begin my days by painting before I engage with my second life, that way painting has become a natural habit to me, and now I can produce up to 150-200 paintings a year.

My work on the female body is a way of exploring forms and imperfections- acting like a visual quest to self-acceptance.

Do you have any favourite cultural institutions or places?

The Louvre, old libraries full of books, The Musée d’Orsay. I miss the freedom of living in Paris where I could escape to a museum for an hour, look at a single work and then leave.

I miss the freedom of living in Paris where I could escape to a museum for an hour, look at a single work and then leave.

What’s next on the agenda?

I was in London for The Other Art Fair and it was an honour to have been selected as one of the “Not 30%.” It was an exhibition dedicated to 30 women artists, because women are only represented 30% of the time in the art world. More recently I was in Paris with Galerie Jean Louis Cleret, and in June I’ll travel to Tokyo for the Tokyo International Art Fair! I’ve always dreamt of going. It’ll be another year of travel, which brings us back to the first question.